Housing & Area-Based Characteristics

Research Categories - Housing & Area-Based Characteristics

Developing the potential of the NILS and SLS for studying peer effects in health: A case study of fertility amongst neighbours and co-workers.

Neighbours and work colleagues can all potentially have an influence on our behaviour. For instance, poor health behaviours amongst neighbours and colleagues may normalise and reinforce our own poor health behaviours. This is one example of a peer effect. Imitative behaviour can cause small initial changes in individual behaviour to spread amongst their social networks and result in a ’social multiplier’ effect. Understanding the size and mechanisms behind the ’social multiplier’ effect allows for more...

Residual disadvantage among neighbourhoods in Northern Ireland (NI)

Social determinants of health are defined by the World Health Organization as the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2020). Living in an area of deprivation is a key field of study. Recent research suggests that while area-level deprivation may persist, there is movement of people in and out of these areas (the churn) (Jiang, Pacheco & Dasgupta, 2019).  Within NI we can...

Keeping it, losing it, or gaining it? The loss, retention and uptake of Irish in Northern Ireland

Language loss, retention and gain in small-language groups has attracted much study.  The vast majority of this work has concentrated on communities or individual life courses as the units of analysis although census data have been used to map spatial concentrations of language users, and patterns of advance and retreat through time.  However, there have been little quantitative population-level analyses which combine the general insights of the census with those from community-level studies (although see...

Examining the factors associated with self-harm, suicide ideation and subsequent mortality through data linkage

Self-Harm (SH) and suicide ideation (SI) (i.e. thoughts about dying by suicide) are two of the most important known risk factors for death by suicide. Increasing suicide rates are a major public health concern and Northern Ireland (NI) consistently has the highest rate of suicide in the UK and Ireland. Recent nationwide policies to reduce suicide are now including a focus on reducing SH and SI as these are precursors to suicide. However, little is...

The impact of household typologies on health and mental health within a representative sample of Northern Ireland.

Previous research has identified how the household environment, work and family composition can determine a person’s well-being, physical and mental health. One strand of such research has focused on household characteristics, although this has mostly been applied within the continental European context and only rarely within the context of the UK, especially Northern Ireland. Understanding the household structure based on its social, work and family composition and its impact on mental health/health would provide valuable...

Trends in the risk to wellbeing of residents in the North Down area.

This research idea was submitted to Queen’s University Science shop by the North Down Community Network (NDCN).

Spatialising health inequalities in Northern Ireland: A GIS based analysis of the relationship between socioeconomic status and respiratory disease.

Socioeconomic status (SES) is often seen to relate to health inequalities. Wilkinson (1997) found that mortality in developed countries is affected significantly by relative living standards within the population. Social position and material circumstances are said to influence both physiological effects of a lower standard of living and also the psychosocial condition of individuals.

Frequency of Moving Home in Northern Ireland.

The aim of the project is to shed light on how frequently people move home, and especially about the types of people who change address the most and also the least. This question is prompted by our recent research on England and Wales using the ONS Longitudinal Study to examine change of address between one census and the next, 1971-2011, which itself was prompted by observations of sharp declines in migration intensity in the USA...

Internet usage and residential moves: What do we know?

It is normally important to have accurate address information for statistical and health-screening purposes. However, internet-based methods (eg email) can be used as an alternative and they have the virtue of being ‘placeless’ (eg not tied to a fixed address or geographical location). This could be of value when people change address and become hard to contact if they do not update their address information in administrative data sources.

Do Economic, Social and Health Outcomes Differ Between People Who Remain in Rural Areas and Those Who Leave?

The project is concerned with the impact of residential (im)mobility on the later health, labour market and educational outcomes of rural residents in 1991 and 2001. In particular, an answer is sought to the question of whether moves from remote rural areas to urban areas lead to more favourable outcomes in comparison with those who live continuously in rural areas. One level of analysis will be to look at the changing demography of places through...

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