Reproduction, Fertility & Pregnancy

Research Categories - Reproduction, Fertility & Pregnancy

Developing the potential of the NILS and SLS for studying peer effects in health: A case study of fertility amongst neighbours and co-workers.

Neighbours and work colleagues can all potentially have an influence on our behaviour. For instance, poor health behaviours amongst neighbours and colleagues may normalise and reinforce our own poor health behaviours. This is one example of a peer effect. Imitative behaviour can cause small initial changes in individual behaviour to spread amongst their social networks and result in a ’social multiplier’ effect. Understanding the size and mechanisms behind the ’social multiplier’ effect allows for more...

Social and Economic Determinants of Maternal Obesity

The obesity epidemic continues to be one of the biggest public health challenges in the 21st century. Rates continue to rise globally and at all stages of the life course. In pregnant women this can be especially problematic due to the increased risk of pregnancy complications, subsequent non-communicable diseases, adverse birth outcomes and increased risk of obesity and metabolic diseases in later life for the offspring. The latest published figures in Northern Ireland 2017/18 show...

Examining the area effects and health on variation in reproductive behaviour.

There is a growing understanding that there are social gradients in health, teenage birth rates and causes of morbidity and mortality. However, the more ultimate causes and the more precise patterns that underlie this variation is yet largely unknown. The overall project aims to better understand individual and area level effects on reproductive decision-making, health and a deprivation in Northern Ireland.

Fertility in Northern Ireland 2001-2011: The Influence of Education and Migration.

This is a development of the NILS022 project where a statistical analysis was based upon a panel of women aged 15-44 over the period 1997-2007 that was constructed from the NILS. A similar methodology is proposed; the statistical analysis consists of a panel logit analysis of whether a birth occurs in a period; the explanatory variables will include parity, duration, religion and locality variables.

Is the risk of teenage pregnancy influenced by area of residence?

The UK has the highest rates of teenage pregnancy in Western Europe and while these have been gradually falling across the UK (including NI) since 2002, rates of pregnancy for girls aged less than 20 remains high. While it is acknowledged that not all teenage pregnancies are unintended and that the life course for teenage parents is not necessarily negative, unintended pregnancy remains a major component of adolescent pregnancies and can risks considerable adverse health...

Who you are or where you live? Examining the impact of individual and area level effects on reproductive decision-making, health and risky causes of deaths in Northern Ireland. Part one: fertility and reproductive behaviour.

There is a growing understanding that there are social gradients in health, teenage birth rates and causes of morbidity and mortality. However, the more ultimate causes and the more precise patterns that underlie this variation is yet largely unknown (Nettle 2010). The overall project aims to better understand individual and area level effects on reproductive decision-making, health and a range of “risky” behaviours related to mortality in Northern Ireland.

Forecasting Fertility in Northern Ireland using a Time Varying Coefficients Model.

The project builds upon the earlier study NILS 022, Predicting Short Run Changes in Fertility in Northern Ireland. The project assembled a panel of women from 1997 – 2007 aged between 16 and 44 years in each year, together with their characteristics drawn from the 2001 census and the births they had each year from the GRO. The analysis was based on the logit model with time dummies employed as the basis of the forecast...

Prevalence and patterns of antidepressant use among women of reproductive age in Northern Ireland.

Antidepressant exposure is high among women of childbearing age in Northern Ireland. A preliminary analysis of Health and Social Care Business Services Organisation Enhanced Prescribing Database has estimated a prevalence rate at 19.2% among women aged 15-45 years for July 2008 – February 2010. It is important to regularly monitor medicinal drug use among women of childbearing age and those in early pregnancy because the teratogenicity of most prescription drugs is undetermined and many pregnancies...

Religion, fertility and space.

Future demand across the school sectors (controlled, maintained and integrated) in Northern Ireland is a public policy issue that requires timely and accurate information. While the most recent currently available counts for the school population are derived from information collected at the Census 2001, a current understanding of differing fertility levels, and future school populations, by area of residence and community background would provide significant assistance to those determining planning for schools, and equality of...

Predicting Short Run Changes in Fertility in Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland has in recent years shared the slight upturn in fertility evident in some European countries. This contrasts with the steady fall in fertility from the peak of the ‘baby boom’ in the 1960s that is associated with increased female participation in the labour market and delay in the age of child bearing. Any change in the pattern of fertility has profound consequences for the provision of public services, particularly in education and health...

Supported By Funding From